Single-engine Cessna nears mid-air collision with Delta Boeing 757

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Terrifying single-engine moment Mid-flight, a Cessna nearly collided with a Delta Boeing 757: “I knew it wasn’t going well, so I climbed in as fast as I could,” the pilot explained.

The pilot of the single-engine plane, Malik Clarke, recalled the chilling encounter in a recent interview with ABC News, recalling how he was forced to take Clarke's quick thinking apparently paid off, with both planes narrowly avoiding impact from a margin of just 500 feet – this would more than likely have been fatal for all pilots involved as well as the plane's passengers.Pictured is Clarke's single-engine Cessna that he had flown during the close call, which happened on August 17.  No casualties were reported thanks to Clarke's quick thinking mid-air.The shocking footage comes just days after high winds flipped a small, single-passenger plane (pictured Thursday) at another Orlando airport, Orlando Executive Airport, killing one and injuring a second.  Both incidents are currently under investigation by the FAA.
A single-engine Cessna nearly collided with a Delta Boeing 757 passenger plane over Orlando International Airport, as the film captured.

The Federal Aviation Administration is currently investigating the near miss which could have caused many deaths if the two planes had collided (FAA)

The video, captured from inside the Cessna, shows the pilot’s response to the emergency, in which he took quick and evasive action by climbing over the climbing plane.

In a recent interview, the pilot, Malik Clarke, described how he was forced to take “evasive action” to avoid the airliner.

Incredible aerial film captures the moment a single-engine Cessna nearly collided with a Delta Boeing 757 passenger flight in flight over Orlando International Airport – a near collision that could have resulted in mass casualties.

Last month, as lines lengthened ahead of the busy Labor Day weekend, the much smaller Cessna came within 500 feet of the fully loaded Orlando International jumbo jet.

Video recorded from inside the Cessna shows the pilot’s commendable response to the crisis, in which he took swift and evasive action as he climbed over the rapidly climbing plane – narrowly escaping a collision a few feet.

In a recent interview with ABC News, the pilot, Malik Clarke, detailed the terrifying encounter, describing how he was forced to take “evasive action” to avoid the much larger airliner full of passengers – an incident which is currently under investigation by the FAA.

This happened while I was flying with two of my buddies two days ago (08/17/2022). At Orlando Intl MCO, controllers provided me and another Delta Airlines pilot with departure headings that would have us converge after takeoff. pic.twitter.com/2oAHuab39v

— Malik Clarke (@malik dambah) August 19, 2022

Stunning aerial film captures the moment a single-engine Cessna nearly collided with a Delta Boeing 757 passenger flight in flight over Orlando International Airport – a near collision that could have resulted in mass casualties.

In a recent interview with ABC News, the pilot of the single-engine plane, Malik Clarke, detailed the terrifying encounter, recalling how he was forced to take “evasive action” to avoid the much larger jetliner and full of passengers – an incident that is currently under investigation by the FAA.

Clarke told the TV station about the near miss, recalling how on August 17 he watched the plane climb rapidly towards his plane.

Clarke said, “I quickly turned right and climbed as steeply as I could, as Delta’s Boeing 757 had a significantly higher rate of climb than the plane I was flying.”

Clarke’s quick thinking seems to have paid off, as the two planes narrowly avoided a collision by a margin of just 500ft – which would more than likely have been fatal for all pilots and passengers.

Clarke confessed to the outlet, “If I hadn’t performed that evasive move, it’s highly likely that there would have been an in-flight accident.”

Clarke’s quick thinking appears to have paid off, as the two planes narrowly avoided a 500-foot collision that would have been devastating to pilots and passengers.

Clarke said he had just changed frequency and was out of contact with air traffic control when the Delta aircraft passed directly under his aircraft, which put additional pressure on the pilot as the fate of both thefts rested primarily in his hands.

Correspondence from pilots to air traffic control following a near miss over Orlando, transcribed

Tower: ‘Runway 36l, take-off authorised.’ Number 54 kilo, departure contact.’

Cessna pilot: ‘Go to start, 54 kg.’

Tower: “N5254K, approaching Orlando, Roger. What heading were you given?

Cessna pilot: ‘090 we saw it. We noticed it coming, so we reduced our speed to 150, but they gave us 090 up to 2000.’

Delta pilot: “Tower, we have just observed the traffic passing directly above us. »

Clarke posted a video of the incident on social media from the cockpit of the Cessna, which shows the Delta plane flying dangerously close to the Cessna, which was only carrying Clarke at the time.

The two pilots observed each other and contacted air traffic control immediately after the near miss.

The FAA said the pilots of the two planes said they were able to see each other, providing a transcript of the correspondence as part of their ongoing investigation into why the planes were closer than expected.

Steve Ganyard, a former State Department official and current ABC News contributor, is convinced someone was responsible for the near miss, though he hasn’t identified whether it was Clarke or anonymous pilots of the 757.

“The two planes approached 500 feet vertically and 1,500 feet horizontally, which is definitely too close,” Ganyard said.

Someone made a mistake placing them in the same region of the sky.

Delta said it was conducting its own internal investigation into the near miss and “nothing is more important than safety” in a statement.

Per agency policy, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, the union representing air traffic controllers, declined to comment on the ongoing FAA investigation.

Pictured is Clarke’s single-engine Cessna, which he flew during the August 17 close approach. Clarke’s quick mid-air thinking prevented any casualties from occurring.

In contrast, Orlando International Airport has yet to comment on the incident.

The video was captured just days after high winds flipped a single-passenger plane at another Florida airport, killing one and injuring another.

The FAA reported on Friday that the two were on board the twin-engine Diamond DA42 Twin Star when it rolled over due to winds of up to 40 mph while waiting to take off at 5 p.m. Orlando.

A representative from the Orlando Fire Department said that when rescue crews arrived on the scene, one victim had already died.

Another passenger was sent to Orlando Regional Medical Center. Their current condition is unknown and none of the victims have been identified.

Both events come as airlines continue to deal with staffing and scheduling constraints caused by the pandemic, ongoing economic instability and a tight labor market, with pilots picketing in 14 major airports.

The chilling image was captured just days after a small, single-passenger plane was blown over by high winds at another Orlando airport, Orlando Executive Airport, killing one and injuring another . The FAA is currently investigating both cases.

The union last week announced the participation of pilots from Delta Air Lines, Endeavor Air, JetBlue, Sun Country, Spirit Airlines and United Airlines.

However, these airlines stressed that these pilots are not in service – and that the protests will not cause delays or cancellations despite the busy holiday weekend, which saw some 13 million Americans travel in the whole country to ring in the end of the summer.

Both events are currently under investigation by the FAA.

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