New noise camera trial comes to Bradford – is it illegal to run a noisy engine?

0

[ad_1]

The first noise detection cameras will be deployed in Fell Lane, Keighley, using a video camera and multiple microphones to pinpoint excessively noisy cars as they pass.

This means that if drivers break the law by running their engines unnecessarily or using illegal exhaust, they will be automatically detected.

The camera takes a picture of the vehicle and records the noise level to create a digital body of evidence that can be used by local law enforcement to fine drivers.

The trial will begin on Tuesday, October 18.

Councilor Alex Ross-Shaw, Portfolio Holder for Regeneration, Planning and Transport, said: “I am delighted that Bradford has been successful in securing the noise cameras trial. Antisocial conduct causes real upheaval and damage. People should not have to put up with excessively noisy vehicles in their communities.

“We welcome the development of technology that could, in the future, help identify drivers who willfully ignore noise laws and enable enforcement action to be taken against them.

“Hopefully the data collected from the trial will help provide appropriate legislative governance for wider deployment of the technology in the UK.”

“We are happy to also meet the needs of the community by organizing this trial.”

The noise-detecting cameras have been welcomed by Shahid Islam of Born in Bradford, senior researcher at the Bradford Institute for Health Research.

Road noise is known to contribute to health problems, such as heart attacks, strokes and dementia. The annual social cost of urban road noise – including lost productivity due to sleep disturbance and health costs – is estimated at £10 billion.

New 'noise cameras' set to crack down on Bradford 'boy racers' and use of illegal exhaustsShahid Islam, pictured, is a senior researcher at the Bradford Institute for Health Research

Mr Islam told the Telegraph & Argus: ‘Excessively noisy engines serve no purpose other than to generate noise pollution which is not good for your health.

“They make our shared outdoor spaces unsafe, affect sleep quality and are often accompanied by aggressive driving.

“We need to find ways to address these issues if we are serious about improving people’s health and well-being.”

In 2018, a health impact study for Bradford looked at “socio-economic inequalities in exposures and mortality related to urban and transport planning”.

In the study, the academics said: “A greater number of deaths (i.e. 253 and 145, respectively) could be avoided by reducing air and noise pollution levels well below instructions.”

The report adds: “Chronic noise exposure is increasingly linked to adverse health effects.”

After the £300,000 trial in Bradford, cameras will then travel to Bristol, Great Yarmouth and Birmingham.

The locations were chosen following a competition organized by the Department for Transport to find the noisiest streets in Britain.

Extensive testing at a private test track facility took place to perfect the technology prior to trial deployment.

Now, in the next phase, locations have been chosen based on the impact on local residents of loud illegal vehicles.

New 'noise cameras' set to crack down on Bradford 'boy racers' and use of illegal exhaustsThe first noise detection cameras will be deployed in Keighley, using a video camera and multiple microphones to pinpoint excessively noisy cars as they pass.

MPs across the country have requested that a camera be installed in their area.

If successful, the cameras could be deployed across the country.

Transport Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan said: “Beware of rowdy road drivers – these new cameras will help police crack down on those who break legal noise limits or use illegal modified exhausts to make excessive noise in our communities.

“We will work closely with local authorities and police to share any findings, and I hope this technology will pave the way for quieter, more peaceful streets across the country.”

Gloria Elliott OBE, chief executive of the Noise Abatement Society, added: “Excessively loud vehicles and anti-social driving cause disruption, stress, anxiety and pain for many. It is dangerous and disrupts the environment and people’s peaceful enjoyment of their homes and public places.”

New 'noise cameras' set to crack down on Bradford 'boy racers' and use of illegal exhaustsAn example of a car cruise event in Bradford

Atkins-Jacobs Joint Venture acts as a technical consultant for the trials, providing acoustic expertise, design, modeling and asset management. The noise camera is designed and developed by MicrodB.

Noise detection cameras were first introduced by former Transport Secretary Grant Shapps.

Speaking at the time of the contest, the minister said: ‘For too long rowdy drivers have been able to get away with disturbing our communities with loud, illegal vehicles.

“It’s time to crack down on this nuisance, banish the runner boy and restore peace and quiet to the local streets.”

[ad_2]
Source link

Share.

Comments are closed.